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  • A Brief History of the Herschede Hall Clock Company

  • DATE your Herschede NOW! FREE!

  • The LETTER September 23, 1983 (Informing dealers, The End of Finished Clock Production)

  • The Last Herschede Hall Clock

  • FAQ (Frequently Ask Questions)

  • Herschede Clocks For SALE

  • Listen - The Exclusive Herschede Canterbury chime mp3 2198 kb

    Historic Photos Below

    Dick Herschede & Service Award Clock, circa 1984.

    Starting Full time employment with the company Feb. 4, 1934 with his Father Walter, Dick was awarded this clock at the closing of the plant for his 50 years of service. It is now an Heirloom of the Herschede Family. Larger Image

    Rich Herschede Signs Clocks at Champ's, July 28,1984.
    The only hand signed Herschede clocks were signed at Champ's on July 28, 1984 by Richard Herschede Jr. (only about 15 pieces in all).
     Larger Image

     Advance Story in the Atlanta Journal Constitution Inviting folks to the Signing party. View

    Rich Herschede & Champ during Market, circa 1984.

     Richard Herschede was the first person in the clock business to trust and encourage us to take a large order and promote it, unlocking Champ's potential to move a large amount of clocks in a short time. Larger Image

    Herschede Video: How they were made. Factory made promotional 9 min. video. Includes video of Richard Herschede signing Herschede clocks at Champ's (Not available on download). Available for purchase on Vhs format for $29.50 Order via E-mail
    or Watch on You Tube

    See A Chime filled Walk through Champ's Clock Shop
    YouTube Video

    A Brief History of the Herschede Hall Clock Company

     Frank Herschede was born on July 30, 1857 in Cincinnati, Ohio. At the age of 16, he started to work as an apprentice watch and clock repairman.

     In 1877, he went into business for himself and moved to Vine and 5th Street. He branched out to jewelry, watches, diamonds, ect., and in 1885, the store moved to larger quarters at the corner of Arcade and Vine. In this same year, he started to import movements and have his cases made in a cabinet shop on Front Street in Cincinnati, Ohio. The clock business expanded to the point that Frank bought out the cabinet shop in 1900.

     In 1901, he exhibited in the South Carolina and West Indian Exposition at Charleston, South Carolina, where he received a gold medal for his hall clocks. This was the first of several.

     Frank's son, Walter, graduated from high school in 1902, and went into the cabinet shop to work. On December 29 of this same year, steps were taken to incorporate the Herschede Hall Clock Company.

     The factory moved from Front Street to 1011-1015 Plum Street in 1903. Several medals were won by Herschede in the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis in 1904; a gold medal for the best hall clock, a gold medal for the best hall clock cases, and a silver medal for tubular chimes.

      In 1909, the company leased the building next door at 1007-1009 Plum Street to make clock movements. The first movement was assembled and passed final inspection on January 10, 1911. In 1913, the third melody was added to the Whittington and Westminster chimes. "Cantebury Chimes" was composed by Charles Eisen, "a gifted American pianist," especially for Herschede.

      At the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, the quality of the line again resulted in two major awards: grand prize was presented to the Herschede Hall Clock Company for chime hall clocks and mantel clocks, and a gold medal was awarded for the hall clock cabinets manufactured by the company.

      By the early 1920's branch sales offices were opened, first in New York City, then in Chicago and San Francisco. Frank Herschede died on September 15, 1922, and Walter was named president in January of 1923.

      In 1925, Walter started to work with Mr. Warren with the electric movement chime clocks. By April of 1926, the Revere Clock Company came into being.

      On February 4, 1934, Walter's son, Dick Herschede, started full time employment with his father. Many years later, in 1959, contact was made with the North Mississippi Industrial Development Association, and the plant moved to Starkville, Mississippi in May of 1960.

      In 1973, Herschede merged with Howard Furniture and Briarwood Lamps into Arnold Industries, Inc.

      On September 23, 1983, Herschede implemented a plan to restructure the Herschede Hall Clock division from a manufacturer of the finished clocks to a supplier of quality tubular bell movements to the industry.

      On August 21, 1984, a letter was written by: Richard L. Herschede. Jr. (President) to certify that the three clocks listed below were the last three clocks shipped form the Herschede factory in Starkville, Mississippi, and that "The Clock" Model #250 Serial # A642698-35 being the very last of the three shipped from the factory.

      These clocks were shipped to Champ's Clock Shop - 3834 King Drive, Douglasville, Georgia on July 23, 1984.

      Richard L. Herschede. Jr. visited Champ's Clock Shop on July 28, 1984 and personally signed these three clocks.

    * DUKE OF MALBOROUGH - MODEL # 8861 - SERIAL # A642483-16
    * THE CLOCK - MODEL # 250 - SERIAL # A642647-34
    * THE CLOCK - MODEL # 250 - SERIAL # A642698-35

    Date your Herschede Clock by Movement Serial Number

    Look on the back plate of your clock's brass movement. The serial number is usually in the center near the bottom of the works just above the seat board.

    Look in the Side or Back

    Look at the Back of the Movement

    Serial no. is Centered


    See Table Below
    Note: No Date records are available if your clock was made before 1911, If the movement was imported or supplied by other U.S. clock makers such as Seth Thomas, or if your clock was made after 1968. Is the chart 100% accurate? I don't know, this is all that is available.
    Tip: When Dating Old Models, If you are Comfortable removing your Clock's Weights?
    Let your clock run down so your cable doesn't get crossed & at your own risk, you can open an original weight shell (the hook is a nut) to reveal the lead insert. The Insert is usually wrapped with a Cincinatti News Paper or German News Paper.
    This Dates your clock really close.

     Date

     Serial Number

     Date

    Serial Number

     Date

     Serial Number

    1911

    1-66

    1923

    7,665-7,700

    1928

    32,030-32,050

    101-141

    10,351-10,354

    32,504-32,505

    151-200

    10,501-10,534

    79,101-99,900

    214-134

    11,951-12,076

    1929

    32,101-32,105

    243-246

    12,101-12,155

    32,506-32,512

    1912

    67-100

    12,268-12,350

    99,901-123,500

    142-150

    13,733-14,016

    1932

    250,001-255,700

    201-150

    14,151-15,000

    1933

    255,701-261,000

    235-242

    15,351-15,800

    1934

    113,001-215,600

    247-400

    16,670-17,600

    261,001-269,381

    1913

    401-536

    18,001-18,450

    1935

    271,382-285,268

    551-602

    18,501-19,000

    1936

    285,269-298,323

    1,001-1,491

    19,101-20,500

    1937

    298,725-313,243

    1914

    537-550

    21,701-22,500

    1938

    313,244-315,745

    603-816

    24,701-24,850

    1939

    316,247-325,376

    1,492-1,802

    1924

    10,355-10,362

    1941

    347,103-361,368

    1,853-2,302

    12,951-13,000

    1942

    362,135-394,133

    1915

    817-1,000

    17,601-18,000

    1945

    386,000-407,326

    1,803-1,852

    18,451-18,500

    1946

    401,077-424,068

    2,303-2,600

    19,001-19,100

    1947

    424,069-489,768

    2,666-2,607

    20,501-21,780

    1948

    105,552-130,576

    2,901-3,218

    22,501-23,400

    391,000-506,000

    1916

    2,601-2,604

    23,501-24,700

    1949

    130,577-151,226

    2,769-2,792

    24,851-30,000

    512,001-521,535

    2,806-2,847

    36,001-36,350

    1950

    151,227-163,478

    3,219-4,233

    1925

    7,560-7,664

    521,536-539535

    1917

    2,605-2,664

    10,535-10,555

    1951

    163,479-175658

    2,671-2,750

    10,814-10,850

    539,536-558,535

    2793-2,801

    23,401-23,500

    1952

    175,659-187,908

    2,848-2,900

    30,001-32,000

    558,536-564,535

    4,234-5,122

    32,051-32,100

    1953

    187,909-194,158

    5,232-5,556

    32,122-32,200

    564,536-582,535

    7,361-7,445

    32,299-32,415

    1955

    589,036-595,035

    1918

    2,751-2,768

    32,422-32,486

    1956

    595,036-603,965

    2,802-2,805

    32,513-32,750

    1958

    603,966-604,174

    5,123-5,231

    33,001-34,000

    1959

    604,501-605,000

    6,555-7,056

    35,501-36,000

    1961

    605,001-605,843

    7,338-7,360

    36,351-38,400

    1963

    605,895-611,902

    1919

    7,057-7,337

    1926

    10,451-10,457

    1964

    612,446-616,882

    7,455-7,466

    32,001-32,009

    1965

    616,904-617,405

    7,476-7,535

    32,106-32,121

    1966

    617,403-620,403

    7,801-8,800

    32,201-32,298

    1967

    620,404-623,403

    1920

    6,057-6,554

    32,490-32,503

    1968

    623,404-625,903

    7,467-7,475

    32,751-33,000

    7,701-7,800

    34,002-34,004

    8,801-10,350

    34,008

    10,459-10,477

    34,021

    10,651-10,760

    34,029

    10,851-11,900

    34,034-34,035

    12,401-12,600

    34,101-34,121

    12,651-12,800

    34,257-34,258

    1921

    7,446-7,454

    34,268-34,272

    7,536-7,559

    34,282-34,283

    10,401-10,425

    34,286-34,290

    10,901-11,950

    34,294-34,297

    12,351-12,400

    34,302-34,304

    12,601-12,650

    34,313-34,316

    12,801-12,850

    34,323-34,324

    13,001-13,500

    34,327-34,329

    15,001-15,117

    34,363-34,366

    15,801-16,204

    34,477-34,480

    1922

    10,363-10,400

    35,101-35,300

    10,426-10,450

    1927

    10,566-10,575

    10,478-10,500

    32,010-32,029

    10,761-10,813

    32,417-32,441

    12,077-12,100

    34,013-34,014

    12,156-12,266

    34,025-34,027

    12,851-12,950

    34,039-34,040

    13,501-13,732

    34,045-34,049

    14,017-14,150

    34,370-34,372

    15,118-15,350

    34,395-34,398

    16,205-16,669

    35,001-35,100

    35,201-35,500

    The Letter: September 23,1983

    September 23,1983

    Dear Herschede Dealer:

      It is with deep regret that we inform you that Arnold Industries will immediately implement a plan to restructure the Herschede Hall Clock division from a manufacturer of the finished clocks to a supplier of quality tubular bell movements to the industry.

      We have tried extremely hard to avoid such a substantial change in our company, but the changes in the economy and the market led us to this decision. Consumer compromise to less expensive, mass produced clocks along with deep discounting by manufacturers has created unsettled market factors. Additionally, you are aware that our national economy has weakened for a number of years, adding to the declining demand for high quality luxury goods.

      We plan to be at the October market to take orders for cases already in production, and we will assemble and finish clocks until current inventories are depleted. We expect to be able to accept clock orders for the next six to nine months.

      John Robert Arnold, the Board of Directors and the Herschede staff Join me in thanking you for faithful service and support of Herschede. We hope you will continue to sell our movement in clocks manufactured in the future by other clock manufacturers. Any support that you might give us in our new direction will be greatly appreciated.

    Sincerely,                                             

    Richard (Rich) Herschede, Jr.         
    General Manager                              

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    What Model Hershede do I Have? There are usually three sets of numbers stamped on the back of the Herschede Hall clock Cases. One number will be on every removable piece of the clock, this is the production line number, One number is the Model number, usually three digits, The other number, well I'm not sure what is is. Clocks with four digit numbers, while very nice clocks, are usually lower end models with German rod chime movements.. A reference photo goes a long way to identifying your clock. Without a photo attached there is no way to know what you have if the numbers don't jive with available literature. Herschede Catalog reprints from the early 1/3 of the 1900s are available from some vendors and sometimes on Ebay. Some models such as the 294 Haverford were made from the End of the depression till closing in 1984. You need the movement serial number date your Herschede.

    What is my Clock Worth? Herschede Halls clocks as of the late1990's were just coming into their own era of a true collectors item status although they have always been a symbol of Wealth. Large Hall Clocks with Herschede Made 9 Tubular bell movements and Hand Engraved Dials are the most valuable of the line. Just about any of them in good complete and well maintained condition should have a retail value of at least $20,000.00 - $30,000. Five Tube movement models with Cast dials $8,000 - $12,000.
    Mantel and wall clocks while rare are not as recognized for value. The lack of reference material does not help. There is almost no reference for later clocks made with German movements. Most walls and mantels range from $200 - $1000.

    How much can I expect to actually get for a Herschede?
    That is another story. Just depends on how bad someone wants your clock at the time plus any other variable imaginable. In this economic time of depression, Unfortunately these fine clocks are not bringing the premium that they once did. I have no doubt that one day the values will be back where they should be, but as for now, You are better off keeping your clock. If you must sell your clock, Ebay is your best bet to expose your clock to a potential buyer. Take high quality photos and state all details known about the clock. The more you know about your clock's history the better.

    How much should I insure my Herschede for?
    Most Herschede Tubular bell models Insure for $12,000 to $25,000. Five tube clocks with cast dials are worth less than Premium Model clocks with Hand Engraved Dials. Antique Herschede clocks all depend on condition and just how elaborate the case may be. The fancier the more valuable. Walls and mantels should be treated as any other clock of the era.

    Did my clock win Grand Prize @ Panama-Pacific International Exposition?
     Most likely NO. Herschede was proud of winning the many gold metals that they won over the years so they put a reminder in the form of a Placard on nearly every clock they made after that time. The awards that were presented to Herschede were for the over all product line and not a particular clock.
    Note: If your clock wears this placard it was made after 1915.

    Every Herschede made after the Panama Pacific International Exposition in 1915 wore this Placard. Having this Does Not mean your clock was the Grand Prize Winner.

    Would you be interested in buying my Herschede?
     Most likely NO. With the current economic status, Unless your clock is ridiculously priced below market value, we are not currently making investments.

    Return to Herschede Main Menu

    Herschede Clocks For Sale

    Herschede Model 250

    "The Clock"

    The Last Herschede Ever Made
    After 99.5 years of making of Hershede clocks, This is the very last clock the Original Herschede company produced. Documented and hand signed by Richard Herschede

    $100,000.00

    Herschede Model 294 Haverford

    In production for over 50yrs. Only the last year of production had the addition of side access doors.
    Originally Sold by us in 1984. This Beautiful Mahogany Legend of a clock is in A+ condition .

    87"H x 241/4"W x 143/4"D

    $19,800.00

    Sligh Clock Manufacturing has Ended Forever! (read more)
    As of 9/01/2011 We still have a fair selection of Sligh Clocks In Stock
    Sligh Closing Video Download: sligh5-11newsclip.wmv
    3.49mb 320x240 2:53min. Req. Windows media player 10 or higher
    "Sligh Furniture is phasing out Holland manufacturing and clock business" Reporting: Brad Edwards (Holland, May 11, 2005, 6:00 pm) A big name in furniture in West Michigan is making massive changes. Courtesy of: WorldNow and WOODTV8 / www.woodtv.com Grand Rapids, MI

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